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Singapore Fashion Company Adopts RFID to Be on the Cutting Edge

Decks is RFID-tagging all of its merchandise at the source, and is using the technology to expedite inventory counts and sales transactions, with the goal of boosting sales and attracting and retaining employees.
By Claire Swedberg

At its distribution center, Decks has installed a portal made with Zebra Technologies' FX9500 UHF fixed reader and AN480 reader antennas. When goods arrive, staff members use a "goods receiving" function in the SATO software, by following prompts on the reader screen. The tags that are read are all associated with that particular order, and their status is updated as having been received. SATO software is integrated with Decks' existing enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution, so the data is automatically fed to that ERP management system.

This process replaces the previous system, by which each item's bar-coded label had to be scanned, which slowed the receiving process.

To make a purchase at any of the stores, a customer proceeds to a self-service kiosk, where a Nordic ID Sampo reader captures the tag ID numbers of the items being bought, then updates the inventory data to indicate what has been sold.
When the distribution center ships goods to a store to fill a replenishment order, workers there use the reader portal to interrogate those goods' RFID tags, and the data is updated in the software. Inventory counting at the warehouse is typically performed once annually, and can now be accomplished via a Zebra MC3190-Z handheld reader.

When goods are received at the store, workers there use an MC3190-Z handheld reader to update the software indicating that the goods are at the store. They can then utilize the same handheld whenever conducting an inventory count, by simply walking around the store, capturing tag IDs and forwarding the collected data to the SATO software on Decks' server, to be compared against the existing inventory list. The software can display alerts in the event that the count does not match the expected inventory onsite. That in-store stock counting process takes five to 15 minutes to complete, Chee says.

To make a purchase at any of the stores, a customer proceeds to a self-service kiosk. A Nordic ID Sampo reader built into the kiosk captures the tag ID numbers of the items being purchased. The reader then updates the inventory data to indicate what has been sold, thereby enabling replenishment based on that data.

"We have reduced the time for cashiering," Chee reports, "as we now don't need a cashier to stand at the [cash register]."

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