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January 2004

Magazine ArchiveJanuary 2004
JAN 2004

Features

  • VERTICAL FOCUS
  • A Healthy Dose of RFID
    RFID could dramatically change the healthcare industry by improving the quality of patient care and boosting the efficiency of a largely paper-based industry.
  • FEATURES
  • The 5-Cent RFID Tag
    The promise of a 5-cent tag has many manufacturers and retailers dreaming of a truly automated supply chain. But can it really be achieved? And if so, how long will it take until you can actually buy one? RFID Journal reports.
  • COVER STORIES
  • Mandate for Change
    Thanks to Wal-Mart and the U.S. Department of Defense, suppliers have to spend millions to put RFID tags on pallets and cases. A money pit? Not if companies get smart.
  • COVER STORIES
  • Who Will Pay the Piper?
    Suppliers will eventually be able to pass some of the cost for RFID tags to companies downstream in the supply chain.
  • COVER STORIES
  • Where the Benefits Are
    From receiving and warehouse management to yard management and shipping, here’s how RFID is helping five companies save millions.
  • COVER STORIES
  • Five More Ways to Save
    Depending on the nature of your business, there may be other ways to achieve significant savings with an RFID system.
  • SPECIAL SPONSORED SECTION
  • Silent Commerce Has Arrived
    Radio-frequency identification and related sensor technologies are helping a wide array of companies improve productivity and reduce costs today.
  • CASE STUDIES
  • Pallet Tracking Goes High Tech
    Can RFID transform the way CHEP, a global supplier of wooden pallets and other reusable assets, does business and help its customers save money? CEO Victor Mendes says yes.

Departments

  • Editor's Note
  • Angst and Opportunity
  • Out in Front
  • Top 10 Stories for 2004
    This year will be a critical one for the adoption of radio-frequency identification. Here are the 10 top stories that would make waves in 2004.
  • Out in Front
  • Guide for the Visually Impaired
    Students at the University of Rochester have developed an RFID system that can direct the visually impaired.
  • Out in Front
  • Move Over, R2-D2
    A robot developed by General Dynamics Robotics Systems for the U.S. military takes inventory automatically with an RFID reader.
  • Perspective
  • The Standard Problem
    Achieving the benefits of RFID technology in the global supply chain could hinge on whether two competing protocols can be merged into a single system.
  • Perspective
  • The Ugly Year Ahead
    Progress in the adoption of RFID technology will be overshadowed by failed pilots, self-interests and political infighting over standards.

Columns

  • Road Map
  • Change the Culture
    Companies deploying RFID are focused almost solely on the technology, but it is people who will determine success or failure.
  • Ashton's View
  • Time to Face Reality
    Those who said the Auto-ID Center’s vision of ubiquitous RFID was unrealistic aren’t laughing today. Now all companies have to reevaluate the facts and get real.
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