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New Short-Range UHF Reader Targets Automotive Suppliers

SICK's RFU61x is designed to capture UHF RFID tag reads at short range so that original equipment manufacturers can leverage the tags in tight or crowded assembly locations.
By Claire Swedberg
Apr 16, 2019

Industrial automation sensors company SICK has released a new UHF RFID read-write device focused on assembly applications in conveyor systems in tight spaces, as well as on handling and assembly lines. SICK's RFU61x reader, with integrated Ethernet and fieldbus interfaces, is intended to provide an alternative to 13.56 MHz HF RFID technology used at assembly sites.

The company calls the RFU61x the smallest and smartest industrial UHF reader on the market. The device measures 80 millimeters by 92 millimeters by 38 millimeters (3.15 inches by 3.6 inches by 1.5 inches). SICK demonstrated the new reader at this year's RFID Journal LIVE! conference, held this month in Phoenix, Ariz.

The company has designed the UHF device to capture tag data in tight spaces, with a range that is adjustable to typical HF read distances. One feature, says Philipp Bordne, SICK's RFID product manager, is the design of antenna characteristics that provide a well-defined reading zone. In that way, tagged items, such as small components under assembly, can be reliably identified in spaces where stray reads would be detrimental, despite the fact that UHF rather than HF technology is being used.

Many of SICK's customers are automotive manufacturers that already use UHF RFID technology to track the bodies of the vehicles they assemble, and that read the tags during and after the manufacturing process. Parts suppliers in that industry, however, work in a very different environment, creating small products that are assembled in tight spaces. As such, they often employ HF technology to monitor a component carrier in tight spaces where other products are within close vicinity.

As car manufacturers began requesting that suppliers apply UHF RFID tags directly to their products, SICK started looking for options for parts suppliers to gain value from UHF as well. "We wanted to provide the industry with a solution that takes advantage of the benefits of UHF technology at an earlier stage in the value chain," Bordne explains. One target application of the RFU61x will be the use of small transponders on parts being assembled, with a read range of up to 150 millimeters (5.9 inches). With large transponders, however, distances of 500 millimeters (19.7 inches) will become typical, according to Daniel Thomas, SICK's business development manager for RFID.

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