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STMicroelectronics intros Sigfox-certified IoT solution for industrial asset management ••• Silicon Labs offers LTE-M solution for low-power cellular IoT applications ••• Kerlink launches Japanese subsidiary to serve IoT market in Asia ••• Soracom, Unabiz unveil Sigfox Monarch development kit ••• LoRa Alliance announces new LoRaWAN protocol specs to support OTA firmware updates ••• Longview IoT, GMO GlobalSign, Intrinsic ID partner on IoT security solution ••• HARMAN International opens new headquarters in Israel.
By RFID Journal

PRESS RELEASE:
LoRa Alliance Announces New LoRaWAN Protocol Specs to Support OTA Firmware Updates

The LoRa Alliance, the global association of companies backing the open LoRaWAN protocol for Internet of Things (IoT) low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs), has announced the public availability of three new specifications. Together, the new specifications support and standardize firmware updates over the air (FUOTA), a capability unique to LoRaWAN among LPWANs.

These major enhancements to the protocol are accompanied by significant growth in deployments and certification, with an increase of more than 50% in the number of LoRaWAN CertifiedCM products compared to this time last year. Additionally, the number of public LoRaWAN networks is quickly approaching 100 globally.

"Continued development of standard specifications for the LoRaWAN protocol is key to enabling interoperability between end-device providers and network providers," said Donna Moore, CEO & Chairwoman of the LoRa Alliance. "The new specifications showcase how our members collaborate to continuously advance LoRaWAN. The rapid uptick of LoRaWAN Certified products validates that the market stands behind the need for IoT devices that deliver a proof of quality."

The LoRa Alliance has a rapidly growing ecosystem in Japan with members actively deploying LoRaWAN networks and solutions. Recent examples include NEC providing LoRaWAN network servers for remote liquefied petroleum gas meter reading, and SenseWay deploying a LoRaWAN network on the Kashiwanoha Campus to acquire and visualize the city's environmental information to build a true smart city.

The LoRa Alliance is hosting its Q4 Members' Meeting in Tokyo this week, with its LoRaWAN Live showcase taking place, October 25, in the Hilton, Tokyo 2, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 160-0023. LoRaWAN Live will feature presentations and demonstrations from our large member ecosystem covering the latest technologies and key use case and deployment stories. Japanese member company and event sponsor, M2B Communications, will deliver a keynote titled "LoRaWAN and disaster prevention," during the morning session. Additionally, a signing ceremony to announce a strategic liaison between the LoRa Alliance and the IoT Connectivity Alliance will take place. The Marketplace will feature demos from the following companies: Actility, Daliworks, Kiwi Technology, LoRa Alliance, M2B Communications, Macnica, Manthink, Multitech, Murata, RedwoodComm, Semtech, SenseWay, STMicroelectronics, Tektelic, Viloc and Yokogawa Electric.

These specifications were developed to allow the LoRa Alliance ecosystem to perform FUOTA in a standardized way. The ability to update devices remotely is critical for the IoT, where many sensors are in remote or difficult locations to reach but may require updating. Making FUOTA part of the specification contributes to future-proofing LoRaWAN and ensuring that LoRaWAN devices will continue to operate over long lifetimes.

Together, the new specifications enable FUOTA. However, three separate specifications have been issued because each can be used independently. For example, the remote multicast setup protocol can be used standalone to send messages to a group of end-devices; fragmentation can be used on its own to send a large file to a single end-device (unicast); and time synchronization can also be used as a standalone capability.

As is true for the LoRaWAN protocol as a whole, security was a strong focus of this development effort and is addressed in the Multicast and Fragmentation specifications. For multicast, the protocol has a means to securely deliver a cryptographic key to the group of end devices. This key exchange is described with its security implication. In fragmentation, a section is dedicated to file integrity and authentication recommendations.

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